CDL School Tip: Why One on One CDL Training Works Best – Sage Truck Driving Schools
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CDL School Tip: Why One on One CDL Training Works Best
  • Watch your mirrors
  • Keep an eye on your gauges
  • Listen to the engine
  • Shift smoothly
  • Learn to double-clutch
  • Know where your trailer is
  • Keep an eye on other traffic
  • Pay attention to your speed
  • Drive at night

These are just a few of the skills you will learn in truck driving school. It is a lot to learn.

But just like learning any other “hands-on” skill, the best way to learn is to spend time actually doing it. Imagine trying to learn how to throw a football or play the guitar or ride a bike, if mostly what you did is WATCH someone else do it?

Unfortunately, most truck driving schools want you to do exactly that. You pay to watch other students drive on the road. Most schools put 3 or 4 students in a truck and rotate you into the driver’s seat for your 15 or 20 minutes of time behind the wheel. The rest of the time you are sitting in a bench seat in the sleeper area – you are WAY BEHIND THE WHEEL!

Don't Pay to Watch!

Don’t Pay to Watch!

At SAGE, all truck driving time spent on the road is done with one student per truck. Just you and the instructor. No one else is in the truck. Most driving sessions are about 4 hours, which means to you get much more time actually driving the truck than at most other schools.

Ask yourself whether you would learn to throw a football better with 20 minutes of coaching or 4 solid hours of one on one coaching? The answer is obvious. And the same goes for learning all the skills you need to drive a truck.

Don’t get tricked into paying for a school where mostly what you will do is watch other students drive. Unless of course you want to pay to sit in the back of the truck, sleep, play video games on your phone, and joke about the guy in the driver’s seat!

A few states may require more than one student, but SAGE is committed to giving every CDL training student the maximum time one on one with an experienced instructor.

Bottom line: don’t pay to watch! Pay to drive.